Mobile Advertising Questionnaire

mobile advertising questionnaire

effectiveness of advertisement

Advertisement is a communication whose purpose is to inform potential customers about products and services and how to use and obtain them. Every major medium is used to deliver these messages, including: television, radio, movies, magazines, newspapers, and internet. It is often placed by an advertising agency on behalf of a company. Advertisement influence our lives in many unsuspecting ways because of rapid changes in the macro environment. These days advertising is regarded as ‘a paid form of non-personal presentation of ideas, goods and services by an identified sponsor Testing or evaluation of advertising effectiveness refers to the managerial exercise aimed at relating the advertising results to the established standards of performance and objectives so as to assess the real value of the advertising performance. This evaluation exercise is also known as the advertising research. It is a research activity undertaken to measure the worth of the specific elements of an advertisement or the aspects of entire advertising programme. It is an attempt to know whether the message designed properly has reached the greatest number of prospects at the least practical cost.  There are various types of media use for advertising these are: print media, electronic media etc. Of all the media, newspaper is considered as the backbone of advertising programme as it has continued to remain the most powerful message carrier. Of the total space, 45 percent goes to advertisements in form or the other and rest for textual matter.

  Television is the youngest, glamorous and highly specialized as it provides         -1-

 

scientific synchronization of sound, light, motion, co lour and immediacy that no other medium does except film. Colour transmission started in 1982 on the eve of ASIAD-82. It is state owned and controlled and is known as DOORDARSHAN. The telecasting system based on coverage is of two types namely, V.H.F. and U.H.F. the latest one is C.A.T.V. which means Community Antenna Television System. Now it is better known as Cable Television.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Need of the Study

 

The average consumer is exposed to more than 1,500 advertising messages everyday. Advertising is everywhere. People may be most conscious of advertising when they watch television, but advertising in its many forms nevertheless pervades society, invades households, and persuades minds nearly every waking moment. And it is not likely to abate any time soon. Company newsletters now frequently carry advertisements. Just 10 years ago, an arena was just an arena, and the baseball park was called Milwaukee County Stadium. To manage costs, naming rights to such venues are now offered. Midwest Express Airlines and Miller Brewing remind people of their generosity (and available cash) every time people pass “their” buildings. Advertising is everywhere. But nowhere is it more apparent than on your television screen. New research released by an advertising industry trade group says the number of television commercials, public service announcements, and station promotions reached an all-time high last year. And it’s not because the networks think viewers need more time to fix a snack or go to the bathroom. “Costs are going up,” says a CBS executive. “And advertising is what covers those costs.” In the average hour, only about 39 minutes is devoted to programming. The balance is called “clutter.”

            Clutter worries the advertising industry. They figure the more commercials stuffed into an hour, the less likely viewers are to remember their clients’ ads. Clutter, whether on television or in any medium, also makes their job harder. It’s up to the advertising agency to create commercials for their clients that stand out from the rest of

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the commercials. There ads must communicate their client’s message more clearly and be better remembered than the muddle of mediocrity that exists among most advertisements. The ads must have punch; make the reader stop from turning the page or the viewer stop from changing the channel. They must break the “boredom barrier.” In short, good advertising must have impact. It’s a fundamental precept of all advertising.

The need was felt to investigate the issues and clutter in advertisement, print and electronic media.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Objectives of the study:

-     To study the effectiveness of advertisement of products under study in 

      newspapers.

 

-     To study the effectiveness of advertisement of products understudy in TV Media

 

-     To analyze and compare the consumers attitude towards advertisement in TV 

      and newspaper Media. The effectiveness of advertisement of products under  

      study in newspapers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Literature Review

1         Peter L. Wright (1974), in his research paper Analyzing Media Effects on Advertising Responses analyze that the medium which advertising information is transmitted is one of the most basic components of the communication environment. Computer models developed to systematize media selection will continue to require inputs estimating how particular media affect the attitudinal responses of audience members. Ideally, media, message, and receiver variables could be integrated in such an analysis, based on empirical evidence of the interrelationships. Yet media variables have been strangely ignored in research on the persuasion process. McGuire, in noting the scarcity of research on media effects, suggests that social influence theories have just not developed “. . . in ways that make channel factors interesting.  However, if the form of transmission shapes the nature of response, media effects become quite interesting. This article will discuss issues in studying media effects and will demonstrate a procedural development for measuring and analyzing communication response

 

1         Stewart A. Smith (1965), in his research paper Criteria for Media Comparisons: A Critique analyse that media planners should not complain about having too few media comparison studies on hand. If anything, media research has reached the stage of ”data indigestion,” and the media planner’s essential problem is not so much collecting needed information as evaluating the abundance of available data. However, the quality of media research has not kept

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pace with the quantity. Nut tall aptly characterizes media comparisons as “a burdened with misunderstandings and steeped in sweeping overgeneralizations.” A likely determinant for the low status of media research is the strong competitive relationship between media. The goal of-most,-if not all, media research is not to advance a general understanding of how media contribute to advertising effectiveness; rather, the goal is a bit more mundane: to attract advertising dollars. And all too often research findings are couched in the language of promotional trumpery; rarely do researchers concern themselves with the theoretical underpinnings necessary for properly evaluating existing media studies and designing new studies. This article focuses on theoretical issues involved in determining appropriate criteria for media comparisons. The broad classes of criteria currently employed in media research are discussed and evaluated in terms of their underlying assumptions. Arguments for two additional criteria for media comparisons are also introduced. Finally, a conceptual model for media comparisons is outlined.

 

2         J. A. P. Treasure(1963), in his research paper The Measurement of Advertising Effectiveness analyse that” the success or otherwise of any advertising campaign is, in the last resort, judged by the extent of any resultant change in the level of sales relative to the cost of running that campaign.” This is a robust and practical approach to the problem which will have a good deal of appeal to many people. It is also an approach which is obviously sensible and correct. However, it is by no

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means a comprehensive statement of the role of advertising effectiveness research. The really important point to grasp here is that an advertising campaign is a complex phenomenon made up of many parts: and that the separate effectiveness of each of the parts is of as much interest to advertisers and their agents as the effectiveness of the campaign in Toto. To put the point another way; an advertising campaign may be regarded as having four major decision-areas, namely-1.Size of expenditure (appropriation policy). 2. Media selection (Press, TV, etc.) .3. Exposure frequency (number and distribution of advertisements). 4. Creative treatment (content and form of advertisements) .There are two points to be made here. First, it should be realized that these four decision-areas are heavily interrelated: for example, if it is decided under to use colour pages in advertising a food product, then this “creative” decision will vitally affect the number of advertisements (and their distribution through time) that can be bought by a given appropriation. Secondly, it should also be appreciated that the decision-areas for Brand A are interrelated to the corresponding decision-areas for its competitors  For example, the size of the advertising appropriation for Brand A in a highly competitive product field cannot be treated in isolation but must be looked at in relation to the sizes of the appropriations for the other brands in its product field, i.e. in terms of shares of total advertising pressure. Thus, it is essential that research into the effectiveness of advertising be capable of assisting correct decision-making in each of these four decision-areas. This means that the

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measurement of the sales effectiveness of advertising cannot be enough since

many of the answers about various parts of the advertising campaign need to be known before the advertising campaign has begun. Moreover, campaign can be, and often is, changed and modified in some degree during its operating existence: research is also required to give guidance as to what kind and extent of modifications are most likely to be successful. This means that the effectiveness of an advertising campaign must be explained as well as measured.

 

3         James R. Wills Jr.; John K. Ryans Jr. (1982), in his research paper Attitudes toward Advertising: A Multinational Study analyse that advertising regulations are expanding on a worldwide basis. While new regulations are being proposed or promulgated in Japan, Portugal, Venezuela, and Egypt,’ the scope of existing legislation in other nations is being broadened.=Beyond the nation-state, discussions of multilateral advertising regulations are emerging in supranational institutions3; for instance, the European Community Programme on Consumer Protection directs much of its attention toward advertising issue, and the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)includes advertising as one activity of multinational corporations that needs to be regulated. Undoubtedly, much of this increased impetus for advertising regulations comes from consumer organizations. National consumer organizations, especially those in Western Europe, have not only grown more powerful, they now cooperate more closely to

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achieve their desired contras. In the case of the United Nations, the ECOSOC

adopted a draft resolution-sponsored by Kenya, Mexico, Uganda, and Venezuela-designed to offer consumer protection assistance to developing nation. Although the developing nations are often the ones who criticize advertising, consumerist organizations of the developed nations also fill an important role in these growing regulatory efforts. What is the source of the growing concern over advertising leading to its increased regulation worldwide? Why is advertising regulation emerging as a central issue in international forums? We may speculate that advertising has drawn so much attention because it is as controversial as it is diverse in its application. Its criticisms have a history nearly as long as advertising itself.  Although specific concerns about advertising range from its impact on children to its use as a new form of colonization, the most central issue of all is its role as a source of consumer information. At the heart of the controversy are basic differences in the perception of how advertising functions in a society. On the one hand, advertisers perceive advertising to be an important source of information for consumers that provides awareness of products and their attributes, both tangible and intangible. Advertising informs potential buyers about alternative products, brands, and models. Conversely, critics argue that advertising has little or no information value for consumers has, instead, many negative dimensions. Hence, regulations to ensure its proper function are demanded.

 

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Advertisement

 

The importance of advertising is “steadily on the increase in modern society.” Just as the media of social communication themselves have enormous influence everywhere, so advertising, using media as its vehicle, is a pervasive, powerful force shaping attitudes and behavior in today’s world.

The field of advertising is extremely broad and diverse. In general terms, of course, an advertisement is simply a public notice meant to convey information and invite patronage or some other response. As that suggests, advertising has two basic purposes: to inform and to persuade, and — while these purposes are distinguishable — both very often are simultaneously present.

Advertising is not the same as marketing (the complex of commercial functions involved in transferring goods from producers and consumers) or public relations (the systematic effort to create a favorable public impression or image’ of some person, group, or entity). In many cases, though, it is a technique or instrument employed by one or both of these.

Advertising can be very simple — a local, even? Neighborhood,’ phenomenon — or it can be very complex, involving sophisticated research and multimedia campaigns that span the globe. It differs according to its intended audience, so that, for example, advertising aimed at children raises some technical and moral issues significantly different from those raised by advertising aimed at competent adults.

Not only are many different media and techniques employed in advertising; advertising itself is of several different kinds: commercial advertising for products and services;

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public service advertising on behalf of various institutions, programs, and causes; and — a phenomenon of growing importance today — political advertising in the interests of parties and candidates. Making allowance for the differences among the different kinds and methods of advertising, we intend what follows to be applicable to them all.

 

Definition of Advertising

“Advertising is bringing a product (or service) to the attention of potential and current customers. Advertising is typically done with signs, brochures, commercials, direct mailings or e-mail messages, personal contact, etc.”

 

Advertising is the paid promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas, by an identified sponsor. Marketers see advertising as part of an overall promotional strategy. Other components of the promotional mix include publicity, public relations, personal selling, and sales promotion”

Advertising objectives

The purpose of advertising is to stimulate demand for a product, service, or idea. Other factors influencing demand are price and substitutability. A major way advertising may stimulate demand is to create a brand franchise for a product. One of the most successful firms to have achieved a brand franchise is Hoover, whose name was for a very long time synonymous with vacuum cleaner (and Dyson has subsequently managed

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to achieve similar status, having moved into the Hoover market with a more sophisticated model of vacuum cleaner).

A brand franchise can be established to a greater or lesser degree depending on product and market. In Texas, for example, it is common to hear people refer to any soft drink as a Coke, regardless of whether it is actually produced by Coca-Cola or not (the more accurate term would be ‘cola’).

A legal risk of the brand franchise is that the name can become so widely accepted that it becomes a generic term, and loses trademark protection. Examples include “escalator”, “aspirin” and “mimeograph”.

Other objectives include short or long term increases in sales, market share, awareness, product information, and image improvement.

 

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MAIN AIM OF ADVERTISING:

3        TO MAKE PEOPLE BUY THINGS

4        WHICH THEY DON’T NEED

5        WHICH THEY ALREADY HAVE

6        FOR WHICH THEY DON’T HAVE MONEY TO BUY FOR

 

Public Service Advertising

The same advertising techniques used to promote commercial goods and services can be used to inform, educate and motivate the public about serious non-commercial issues, such as energy conservation, and deforestation.

Advertising, in its non-commercial guise, is a powerful educational tool capable of reaching and motivating large audiences. “Advertising justifies its existence when used in the public interest – it is much too powerful a tool to use solely for commercial purposes.” – Public service advertising, non-commercial advertising, public interest advertising, cause marketing, and social marketing are different terms for (or aspects of) the use of sophisticated advertising and marketing communications techniques (generally associated with commercial enterprise) on behalf of non-commercial, public interest issues and initiatives.                                                                                                                        -14-

EXAMPLE OF PUBLIC SERVICE ADVERTISING

-           Do boond zindagi ke.

 

The Benefits of advertising

 

Enormous human and material resources are devoted to advertising. Advertising is everywhere in today’s world, so that, as Pope Paul VI remarked, “No one now can escape the influence of advertising.” Even people who are not themselves exposed to particular forms of advertising confront a society, a culture other people — affected for good or ill by advertising messages and techniques of every sort.

Some critics view this state of affairs in unrelieved negative terms. They condemn advertising as a waste of time, talent and money — an essentially parasitic activity. In this view, not only does advertising have no value of its own, but its influence is entirely harmful and corrupting for individuals and society.

We do not agree. There is truth to the criticisms, and we shall make criticisms of our own. But advertising also has significant potential for good, and sometimes it is realized. Here are some of the ways that happens

 

a)      Economic Benefits of Advertising

Advertising can play an important role in the process by which an economic system guided by moral norms and responsive to the common good contributes to human development. It is a necessary part of the functioning of modern market economies,

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which today either exist or are emerging in many parts of the world and which — provided they conform to moral standards based upon integral human development and the common good — currently seem to be “the most efficient instrument for utilizing resources and effectively responding to needs” of a socio-economic kind.

Advertising does this, among other ways, by informing people about the availability of rationally desirable new products and services and improvements in existing ones, helping them to make informed, prudent consumer decisions, contributing to efficiency and the lowering of prices, and stimulating economic progress through the expansion of business and trade. All of this can contribute to the creation of new jobs, higher incomes and a more decent and humane way of life for all.

 

b)     Benefits of Political Advertising

“The Church values the democratic system in as much as it ensures the participation of citizens in making political choices, guarantees to the governed the possibility both of electing and holding accountable those who govern them, and of replacing them through peaceful means when appropriate.”

Political advertising can make a contribution to democracy analogous to its contribution to economic well being in a market system guided by moral norms. As free and responsible media in a democratic system help to counteract tendencies toward the monopolization of power on the part of oligarchies and special interests, so political advertising can make its contribution by informing people about the ideas and policy proposals of parties and candidates, including new candidates not previously known to the public.

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c)      Cultural Benefits of Advertising

Because of the impact advertising has on media that depend on it for revenue, advertisers have an opportunity to exert a positive influence on decisions about media content. This they do by supporting material of excellent intellectual, aesthetic and moral quality presented with the public interest in view, and particularly by encouraging and making possible media presentations which are oriented to minorities whose needs might otherwise go unserved.

Moreover, advertising can itself contribute to the betterment of society by uplifting and inspiring people and motivating them to act in ways that benefit themselves and others. Advertising can brighten lives simply by being witty, tasteful and entertaining. Some advertisements are instances of popular art, with a vivacity and élan all their own.

 

d)     Moral and Religious Benefits of Advertising

In many cases, too, benevolent social institutions, including those of a religious nature, use advertising to communicate their messages — messages of faith, of patriotism, of tolerance, compassion and neighborly service, of charity toward the needy, messages concerning health and education, constructive and helpful messages that educate and motivate people in a variety of beneficial ways.

 

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The harms done by advertising

There is nothing intrinsically good or intrinsically evil about advertising. It is a tool, an instrument: it can be used well, and it can be used badly. If it can have, and sometimes does have, beneficial results such as those just described, it also can, and often does, have a negative, harmful impact on individuals and society.

“If harmful or utterly useless goods are touted to the public, if false assertions are made about goods for sale, if less than admirable human tendencies are exploited, those responsible for such advertising harm society and forfeit their good name and credibility. More than this, unremitting pressure to buy articles of luxury can arouse false wants that hurt both individuals and families by making them ignore what they really need. And those forms of advertising which, without shame, exploit the sexual instincts simply to make money or which seek to penetrate into the subconscious recesses of the mind in a way that threatens the freedom of the individual … must be shunned.”

 

a) Economic Harms of Advertising

Advertising can betray its role as a source of information by misrepresentation and by withholding relevant facts. Sometimes, too, the information function of media can be subverted by advertisers’ pressure upon publications or programs not to treat of questions that might prove embarrassing or inconvenient.

More often, though, advertising is used not simply to inform but to persuade and motivate — to convince people to act in certain ways: buy certain products or services, patronize certain institutions, and the like. This is where particular abuses can occur.

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The practice of “brand”-related advertising can raise serious problems. Often there are only negligible differences among similar products of different brands, and advertising may attempt to move people to act on the basis of irrational motives (“brand loyalty,” status, fashion, “sex appeal,” etc.) instead of presenting differences in product quality and price as bases for rational choice.

“Sometimes advertisers speak of it as part of their task to “create” needs for products and services — that is, to cause people to feel and act upon cravings for items and services they do not need.” If … a direct appeal is made to his instincts — while ignoring in various ways the reality of the person as intelligent and free — then consumer attitudes and life-styles can be created which are objectively improper and often damaging to his physical and spiritual health.”

“It is true that a judicious use of advertising can stimulate developing countries to improve their standard of living. But serious harm can be done them if advertising and commercial pressure become so irresponsible that communities seeking to rise from poverty to a reasonable standard of living are persuaded to seek this progress by satisfying wants that have been artificially created. The result of this is that they waste their resources and neglect their real needs, and genuine development falls behind.”

Similarly, the task of countries attempting to develop types of market economies that serve human needs and interests after decades under centralized, state-controlled systems is made more difficult by advertising that promotes consumerist attitudes and values offensive to human dignity and the common good. The problem is particularly

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acute when, as often happens, the dignity and welfare of society’s poorer and weaker members are at stake. It is necessary always to bear in mind that there are “goods which by their very nature cannot and must not be bought or sold”

 

b) Harms of Political Advertising

Political advertising can support and assist the working of the democratic process, but it also can obstruct it. This happens when, for example, the costs of advertising limit political competition to wealthy candidates or groups, or require that office-seekers compromise their integrity and independence by over-dependence on special interests for funds.

Such obstruction of the democratic process also happens when, instead of being a vehicle for honest expositions of candidates’ views and records, political advertising seeks to distort the views and records of opponents and unjustly attacks their reputations. It happens when advertising appeals more to people’s emotions and base instincts — to selfishness, bias and hostility toward others, to racial and ethnic prejudice and the like — rather than to a reasoned sense of justice and the good of all.

 

c) Cultural Harms of Advertising

Advertising also can have a corrupting influence upon culture and cultural values. We have spoken of the economic harm that can be done to developing nations by advertising that fosters consumerism and destructive patterns of consumption. Consider also the cultural injury done to these nations and their peoples by advertising whose

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content and methods, reflecting those prevalent in the first world, are at war with sound traditional values in indigenous cultures. Today this kind of “domination and manipulation” via media rightly is “a concern of developing nations in relation to developed ones,” as well as a “concern of minorities within particular nations.”

The indirect but powerful influence exerted by advertising upon the media of social communications that depend on revenues from this source points to another sort of cultural concern. In the competition to attract ever larger audiences and deliver them to advertisers, communicators can find themselves tempted — in fact pressured, subtly or not so subtly — to set aside high artistic and moral standards and lapse into superficiality, tawdriness and moral squalor.

Communicators also can find themselves tempted to ignore the educational and social needs of certain segments of the audience — the very young, the very old, the poor — who do not match the demographic patterns (age, education, income, habits of buying and consuming, etc.) of the kinds of audiences advertisers want to reach. In this way the tone and indeed the level of moral responsibility of the communications media in general are lowered.

All too often, advertising contributes to the invidious stereotyping of particular groups that places them at a disadvantage in relation to others. This often is true of the way advertising treats women; and the exploitation of women, both in and by advertising, is a frequent, deplorable abuse. “How often are they treated not as persons with an inviolable dignity but as objects whose purpose is to satisfy others’ appetite for pleasure

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or for power? How often is the role of woman as wife and mother undervalued or even ridiculed? How often is the role of women in business or professional life depicted as a masculine caricature, a denial of the specific gifts of feminine insight, compassion, and understanding, which so greatly contribute to the civilization of love.

 

d) Moral and Religious Harms of Advertising

Advertising can be tasteful and in conformity with high moral standards, and occasionally even morally uplifting, but it also can be vulgar and morally degrading. Frequently it deliberately appeals to such motives as envy, status seeking and lust. Today, too, some advertisers consciously seek to shock and titillate by exploiting content of a morbid, perverse, pornographic nature.

We note, too, certain special problems relating to advertising that treats of religion or pertains to specific issues with a moral dimension.

In cases of the first sort, commercial advertisers sometimes include religious themes or use religious images or personages to sell products. It is possible to do this in tasteful, acceptable ways, but the practice is obnoxious and offensive when it involves exploiting religion or treating it flippantly.

In cases of the second sort, advertising sometimes is used to promote products and inculcate attitudes and forms of behavior contrary to moral norms. That is the case, for instance, with the advertising of contraceptives, and products harmful to health, and with government-sponsored advertising campaigns for artificial birth control, so-called “safe sex”, and similar practices.

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Role of celebrities in advertisement

                Glaring truth about Indian advertising and marketing thought – its consuming obsession with everything Bollywood. Marketers seem perpetually in awe of Bollywood icons and iconography. And advertising agencies – either eager to catch the appreciating eye of marketers or out of their own starry-eyed fixation – dole out generous dollops of Bollywood at any given opportunity.

            And therein lies the threat for brands. “Both Bollywood and cricket have become highly commoditised in Indian marketing,” says Nabankur Gupta, founder, Nobby Brand Architects.
            In India, Bollywood risks suffering the same fate at the hands of advertisers and their agencies. Take the preponderance of situations, vignettes and dialogues from Hindi films in Indian ads. Thirty years after Sholay, Indian ads routinely ponder the question, ‘Kitne aadmi the?’

Sidekicks ‘Samba’ and ‘Raabert’ are invoked every week to help clarify some Unique Selling Proposition, while lovelorn Devdas and Paro have peddled        everything from esoteric unction to scientifically formulated shampoo.
As veteran voice-over artist Chetan Shashital points out: “Bollywood dialogues and plots have been done to death in advertising. The answer to ‘Mere paas paisa hai, gaadi         hai, bangla hai… Tumhare paas kya hai?’ is a ready fill-in-the-blank for anything       from a scooter to a home loan to a life insurance policy.”                                                               -23-

 

Adds ad filmmaker Abhinay Deo: “Of the 350-400 scripts I have read over the past three years, 100 have easily had some Bollywood reference. Either it’s a Munnabhai dialogue, or a script that cues into a Saigal-era plot, or a film for some hair oil that opens on a heroine at a shoot.”

Plenty has been said of Bollywood celebrity endorsers and the frequency with which they are snapped up by eager marketers. Agency folk never cease to marvel at the way clients, often with extended family in tow, troop up for shoots involving Bollywood celebrities.
            “It’s the high of having a Bollywood celeb’s number on your mobile,” says one creative head. Filmmaker Prasoon Pandey agrees: “This is another symptom of how clients often allow their personal aspirations to cloud their business decisions.”
Ad agencies, however, cannot be completely absolved of doing likewise. Ad executives can’t stop gushing when faced with the prospect of working with the likes of Amitabh Bachchan, Shah Rukh Khan or Aamir Khan, and ad filmmakers have been known to overlook the limitations of scripts to get a chance to work with big Bollywood faces.
And the rationalisation arguments can be eye-opening. “We felt that the Titan brand had to consistently innovate. So we signed on Aamir Khan as a simple deviation from the past; as a leader we needed to drive the category,” says Ajoy Chawla, business head, Titan Industries. QED.

           

 

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            In the past, Ad agencies have been known to use voice-over artists and mimics as a part of their presentations to clients, and at a recent pitch, one agency went a step further by getting writer and lyricist Javed Akhtar to pen a script!
When it comes to the work, agencies are quick to defend themselves – the problem invariably starts at the client’s end. One creative director who recently presented four scripts for a campaign to a client points out that only one script had a Bollywood reference. But now with the campaign being scaled down to one ad, expectedly, the Bollywood-based script is the one going into production. “Bollywood won on familiarity.
 The problem, many a time, is that what starts as merely a reference point to         elucidate things at a presentation becomes integral to the ad. Conjecture.
Some believe the rampant proliferation of Bollywood is a function of the times. “We’re moving towards the celebrity culture, which leads marketers to resort to Bollywood,” says Titan’s Chawla. Sanjay Bhutiani, business director, BR Films, adds that consumers today want to be perpetually entertained, and “advertising too is seeking to entertain rather than intrude”. “Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is, I don’t know which half.” –

 

 

 

 

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John Wanamaker, father of modern advertising.                                                         

The impact of advertising has been a matter of considerable debate and many different claims have been made in different contexts. During debates about the banning of cigarette advertising, a common claim from cigarette manufacturers was that cigarette advertising does not encourage people to smoke who would not otherwise. The (eventually successful) opponents of advertising, on the other hand, claim that advertising does in fact increase consumption.

            According to many media sources, the past experience and state of mind of the person subjected to advertising may determine the impact that advertising has. Children under the age of four may be unable to distinguish advertising from other television programs, whilst the ability to determine the truthfulness of the message may not be developed until the age of 8.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Research Methodology 

            Research is search for information. Research is an academic activity and as such the term should be used in technical sense.

Research comprises

1        Defining the problem

2        Formulating Hypothesis

3        Collecting, Organizing and Evaluating Data

4        Making Deductions

5        Reaching Conclusions

6        Testing that conclusion Fit the Hypothesis or not

            Research methodology is a way to systematically find a solution to a research problem. This research includes surveys and fact-finding enquiries of different kinds.  I collected primary data from different consumers.

Research Design

Research design used will be Descriptive Research Design as we have to explore the obstacles and also the ways to tackle these obstacles.

Sampling Technique

The sampling technique used here  is Simple Random Sampling

Sample Size

100 respondents have been taken.

 

 

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Sample Unit

Generally all consumers above 18 years of age would be taken as respondents.

 

Data Collection Tools

Through Questionnaires filled by the Respondents.

Through Internet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Analysis and Interpretation

FACTORS

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neither Disagree Nor Agree

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

Regular reader of newspaper

34

15

30

12

9

Watch TV Frequently

22

46

21

10

1

Notice ads while reading newspaper

5

9

39

31

16

Purchase decision based on newspaper ad

67

23

2

5

3

Ever participated in ad contest

13

35

5

29

18

change the channel while ad comes on TV channel

37

22

2

19

20

your purchase decision based on TV ad

9

19

48

20

4

Ever participated in ad contest by TV channel

41

27

11

19

2

You seem to be more influenced by an ad in TV rather than newspaper

15

61

7

14

3

TV ads have more retentions than newspaper ads

1

14

66

13

6

Ads in newspapers are not required

5

26

52

10

7

Views about advertising:

 

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C

Factors

Average

 

1

Regular reader of newspaper

3.63

 

2

Watch TV Frequently

3.78

.

3

Notice ads while reading newspaper

2.56

 

4

Purchase decision based on newspaper ad

4.47

 

5

Ever participated in ad contest

2.96

 

6

change the channel while ad comes on TV channel

3.389447

 

7

your purchase decision based on TV ad

3.09

 

8

Ever participated in ad contest by TV channel

3.86

 

9

You seem to be more influenced by an ad in TV rather than newspaper

 

3.71

 

10

TV ads have more retentions than newspaper ads

2.91

 

11

Ads in newspapers are not required

3.12

 

 

 

 

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             – 31- 

 

 

 

Interpretation:

            Maximum respondents are reading newspaper daily. Maximum respondents said that they agree somewhat that they are watching TV frequently. Maximum respondents have neutral decision about notice of ads while reading newspaper. Maximum respondents said that their purchase decision is based on newspaper ad. Maximum respondents are having neutral view about participation in newspaper ad contest. Maximum respondents change the channel while commercial comes on a particular channel Maximum respondents agree that their purchase decision is based on TV ads. Maximum respondents said that they participated in an ad contest by a TV channel,     Maximum respondents agree somewhat that they are more influenced by an ad in TV rather than newspaper, Maximum respondents they have neutral view about TV ads that they have more retention than newspaper ads, Maximum respondents said that Ads in newspapers are not required. The standard deviation scores of some of the statements is on higher side indicating that the data is quite segregated from the mean but maximum statements have scores which cluster close to the mean. For example: regarding statement 4 the mean score indicates that maximum respondents strongly agree with it as the score is closer to maximum score i.e. 5. But the score of statement 3 indicates that respondents have neutral opinion about it.

 

 

 

 

-32-

 

 

Ques: What do you consider most important in a print ad?

1        Colour Scheme

2        Placement in the newspaper

3        Logo/Sign

4        Punch Line

5        Celebrity

 

 

 

Sr.

No.

Strongly Agree

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Agree

 

Neither Disagree Nor Agree

 

Disagree

 

Strongly Disagree

 

Mean

 

1

36

15

14

18

17

3.35

 

2

27

18

30

15

10

3.37

 

3

9

31

22

28

10

3.01

 

4

29

19

17

15

20

3.22

 

5

11

20

15

15

39

2.49

 

 

                             

 

 

 

-33-

 

 

 

Interpretation:

            Maximum respondents said that Colour scheme is more important in print ad. The standard deviation scores of some of the statements is on higher side indicating that the data is quite segregated from the mean but maximum statements have scores which cluster close to the mean. For example: regarding statement 2 the mean score indicates that maximum respondents strongly agree with it as the score is closer to maximum score i.e. 5. But the score of statement 5 indicates that respondents have neutral opinion      about it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-34-

 

Ques: What do you consider most important in an electronic advertisement

 

1        Brand ambassador/ Celebrity                                                       

2        Picturisation                                                                                 

3        Music                                                                                           

4        Punch Line                                                                                   

5        Visual Affects      

 

 

 

Sr. No.

 

Strongly Agree

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Agree

 

Neutral

 

Disagree

 

Strongly Disagree

 

 

Mean

 

 

1

41

15

20

9

15

3.58

 

2

18

30

19

28

8

2.89

 

3

11

25

26

24

14

2.44

 

4

12

11

20

23

34

3.15

 

5

19

21

15

20

25

3.41

 

 

 

 

 

-35-

 

Interpretation:     

            Maximum respondents said that brand ambassador is more important in TV ad. The standard deviation scores of some of the statements is on higher side indicating that the data is quite segregated from the mean but maximum statements have scores which cluster close to the mean. For example: regarding statement 1 the mean score indicates that maximum respondents strongly agree with it as the score is closer to maximum score i.e. 5. But the score of statement 3 indicates that respondents have neutral opinion      about it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-36-

. Findings&Suggestions

 

1        Advertisement is a valuable promotional element which helps consumers (in purchasing new products)

 

2        Every customer is influenced by advertisement in one way or the other.

3        Company should go for more and more advertisement on regular basis to give awareness to general public about new products and their various uses.

 

4        Consumers are more influenced by ads in TV rather than newspaper. So companies should go for more TV ads than print ads.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-37-

 

 

Limitations Of The Study

 

1        Sample size is small as compare to universe.

2        Respondents are biased towards their personal preferences and they might have not answered the questions correctly

 

3        Due to simple random sampling there may be large deviations from that of universe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-38-

Conclusion

 

            In today’s world advertisement play an important role. A smart customer always possesses the basic knowledge about the product   before going to a shop due to the advertisement & the effectiveness of the   advertisement would lie in the fact if all the expectations of the customers are being   fulfilled.

            The analysis shows that maximum respondents agree that they are more influenced by an ad in TV rather than newspaper. Now a days viewer give more importance to Brand ambassador/ Celebrity, Punch Line, Picturisation, visual affects, music in TV ads. In toady’s era customers of all the age groups mainly demand the products which they have seen in T.V. ads. So we say that now a days TV ads are more important than print ads.

            Television is the youngest, glamorous and highly specialized as it provides scientific synchronization of sound, light, motion, co lour and immediacy that no other medium does except film. Co lour transmission started in 1982 on the eve of ASIAD-82. It is state owned and controlled and is known as DOORDARSHAN. The telecasting system based on coverage is of two types namely, V.H.F. and U.H.F. the latest one is C.A.T.V. which means Community Antenna Television System. Now it is better known as Cable Television. Ads must communicate their client’s message more clearly and be better remembered than the muddle of mediocrity that exists among most advertisements. The ads must have punch; make the reader stop from turning the page or the viewer stop from changing the channel. They must break the “boredom barrier.” In short, good

-39-

 

advertising must have impact. It’s a fundamental precept of all advertising.

            The need was felt to investigate the issues and clutter in advertisement, print and electronic media.” This is a robust and practical approach to the problem which will have a good deal of appeal to many people. It is also an approach which is obviously sensible and correct. However, it is by no means a comprehensive statement of the role of advertising effectiveness research. The really important point to grasp here is that an advertising campaign is a complex phenomenon made up of many parts: and that the separate effectiveness of each of the parts is of as much interest to advertisers and their agents as the effectiveness of the campaign. This means that the measurement of the effectiveness of advertising cannot be enough since many of the answers about various parts of the advertising campaign need to be known before the advertising campaign     has begun.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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